Key Drivers of Successful Implementation of an Employee Suggestion-Driven Improvement Program


I was sent a link to a great peace of work by Harvard University by a friend of ideasUK, Paul Sloane (Destination Innovation) and thought I would share, it is a very interesting piece of work that would be a great starting point to anyone setting up an ideas programme.

Here is an abstract from the paper:

Service organizations frequently implement improvement programs to increase quality. These programs often rely on employees’ suggestions about improvement opportunities. Organizations face a trade-off with such suggestion-driven improvement programs. On one hand, the improvement literature recommends that managers focus organizational resources on surfacing a large number of problems, prioritizing these, and selecting a small set of high priority ones for solution efforts.

The theory is that soliciting a large number of ideas from employees will surface a set of higher priority problems than would have been identified with a less extensive search. Scarce organizational resources can be allocated to resolving the set of problems that provide the greatest improvement in performance. We call this an “analysis-oriented” approach. On the other hand, managers can allocate improvement resources to addressing problems raised by frontline staff, regardless of priority ranking. This “action-oriented” approach enables more resources to be spent on resolving problems because prioritization receives less attention. To our knowledge, this tradeoff between analysis and action in process improvement programs has not been empirically examined.

To fill this gap, we randomly selected 20 hospitals to implement an 18-month long employee suggestion-driven improvement program-58 work areas participated. Our study finds that an action-oriented approach was associated with higher perceived improvement in performance, while an analysis-oriented approach was not.

Our study suggests that the analysis-oriented approach negatively impacted employees’ perceptions of improvement because it solicited, but did not act on, employees’ ideas. We discuss the conditions under which this might be the case.

To download the full paper, follow this link

Full credit for this research goes to Anita L. Tucker and Sara J. Singer and taken from HBS Working Knowledge website.

Of course, ideasUK can help in your quest in launching the ideal engagement programme for your organisation. Contact us today for more information.

Enployee Engagement….The story!


We have now done blog posts on the three speakers at the Engagement Wales event on the 5th July, I thought it would be a good idea to show the story of the day through the tweets of the delegates. Continue reading

Undercover Boss again…


As you know, here at ideasUK we love the Channel 4 show Undercover Boss. In case any of you have never seen this show, it is about a senior manager going back to the floor and working in different parts of the business for a week. Continue reading

Idea of the Year Shortlist 2012


Well it has been a pretty busy time here at ideasUK over the past few weeks. The closing date for entries to the 2012 Idea of the Year Competition came and it was time to shortlist the entries.

Idea of the Year Winners 2010

This year we had over 90 ideas from all over the world including countries such as Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and of course the United Kingdom. Continue reading

Employee Engagement – Is it worth it?


On Monday I was lucky enough to attend an engagement practitioner’s event run by Engaging for Success (E4S) and hosted by The Admiral Group in Cardiff.

Workshop

How can you tell if you employees are engaged in the business?

E4S was set up by the government after the publication of the MacLeod report into employee engagement in the public sector (A copy of the report can be found here) and its aim is to improve engagement within the public sector by giving practitioners the opportunity to network across departments and share best practice.

The day started with an overview of Admiral Insurance and how they deal with engagement and right from the start of the session it was clear this is one area Admiral takes very seriously in its business model. One point Admiral did make several times during the day is that all Continue reading

Recognition – An Analysis Part 3


In the second of the series, we covered the success factors of recognition programmes, here, in the final article we look at the types of programmes you can develop in your organisation.

Programme Content

Include a mix of recognition activities and award programmes that target different goals.

Recognition programmes should include spontaneous, informal and formal awards. This will enable the appropriate recognition to be given in a timely manner. Continue reading

Recognition – An Analysis Part 2


The first article on Monday, looked at what a recognition programme is and why you should have one in your organisation. Today we look at the success factors of the programme.

Recognition should be given frequently and on a timely basis

People like to be recognised. Employees who are recognised will be inspired to higher achievement thereby assisting the organisation to achieve its goals

Praise is a very effective tool and should be used extensively. Recognition must be immediate. Late recognition can be interpreted as a sign that the contribution, and the person who made the contribution, are not valued by the organisation. Continue reading

Recognition – An Analysis Part 1


Today’s post is going to be the first in a series of articles looking at recognition in the workplace.

Here we look at what recognition is and why you should have a programme in your organisation.

What is recognition?  – An acknowledgement

Recognition is an unexpected acknowledgement for a job well done, going the extra mile, performing above and beyond the call of duty. Continue reading

Recognition needs to be Appropriate, Public and Timely by Tom Dupre


Recognition needs to be Appropriate, Public and Timely to be successful in its basic goal. And that goal is to promote behaviours you want to see repeated. Let us look at each of these attributes separately and then collectively.

Appropriate: This topic usually gets a polarizing argument of either money or non-cash rewards. Historically the predominant form of recognition was cash. When organizations benchmarked with those who had suggestion schemes/programs more often than not they would come away with the example of using cash as rewards. Usually the amount of the award was a percentage of the savings over a period of time.

Cash was challenged as a reward mechanism when the Quality initiatives of the 80’s became popular promoting team work to achieve results with no monetary awards. So began the Cash/No Cash debates that exist till today. Cash awards have been modified over the years by reducing maximum payments, percentages of savings and the time period for amount calculations. Note Continue reading

Guest Post – Rewards and Recognition within a Suggestion Scheme


Today’s guest post is written by Tom Dupre

Let’s begin at the end. I always advise people who are looking to start a suggestion process, or who are revitalizing/redesigning a current program, to address the topic of recognition after they have designed the other areas. Rewards should be considered within the broader context of the process and therefore deferred until the end when the broader context has been determined. That said, let us proceed to discuss the role that Rewards and Recognition (R&R) plays in employee involvement schemes and some key elements of this critical component. Continue reading